Bareilly Ki Barfi is a clean and toothsome indulgence

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We are living in times when the concept of independent women and feminism has been largely misinterpreted. The problem with every female-oriented film, be it NH 10, Pink, Angry Indian Goddesses or the recent Lipstick Under My Burkha, is that they portray their male counterparts as dumb, fickle or lusty creatures. Thanks to Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari for coming up with a film that depicts its female lead as an independent woman minus the usual trappings of ‘feminist films’.

Bareilly Ki Barfi revolves around a small-town girl Bitti, played to perfection by Kriti Sanon. The male characters of this film, i.e. Chirag Dubey (Ayushmann Khurana) and Pritam Vidrohi (Rajkummar Rao) have their own set of attributes as well as flaws, which make them more endearing and humane. This is a kind of love triangle where you’d stay invested so much in the lead characters that it would be difficult to root for any of the two prospective grooms.

Loosely based on H. Bruce Humberstone’s ‘Happy Go Lucky’, a British Musical Comedy of the 50s, which inspired many a film like Sajan, Sapnay, Ghajini, to name a few, Bareilly Ki Barfi takes the story a notch above the mistaken identities. It lends an Indian charm to what transpires after the obligatory ‘adlaa-badli’ of the author who penned a flop book, Bareilly Ki Barfi. Now who’s the author and who’s the imposter and who ultimately wins the girl are things best left for you to discover in the auditorium.

The icing on the cake is Javed Akhtar’s voiceover as the film’s witty sutradhaar, which is reminiscent of Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s ‘Baawarchi’. For a change, this sutradhaar doesn’t appear only at the film’s beginning and the end, but stays with you throughout, often taking pot-shots at the film’s characters and situations. It’s time we bring this old-fashioned narration back to our films.

In hindsight, this is the right time to rediscover the roots of Indian films, taking a leaf from stalwarts like Bimal Roy, Satyajit Ray, Hrishikesh Mukherjee and Basu Chatterjee and reintroduce their style to the current generation, rather than relying on those DVDs of Korean films.

There’s no doubt Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari is already championing this cause with her films like Nil Battey Sannata and Bareilly Ki Barfi. Her experience in advertising is evident in the brevity of scenes and putting a message across without lingering over the issue for a long time.

The film’s writing is top-notch. Kudos to writers Nitesh Tiwari (Director of Dangal and the director’s husband), Shreyas Jain, and Rajat Nonia. The songs, ‘Sweety Tera Drama’ by Tanishk Bagchi and ‘Nazm Nazm’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee are sure to stay on your playlist for a long time. Gavemic U Ary, the cinematographer captures the beauty of a small town without distracting the audience with ‘beautiful’ shots.

Among the actors, Kriti Sanon is spot-on as Bitti. In fact, she will now be remembered as Bitti rather than Kriti. The actress internalizes her character so well that her eyes reflect the angst as well as joy of Bitti. The equation that she shares with her father, played by the gem of an actor, Pankaj Tripathi, is quite rare in our films. Devoid of an iota of melodrama, the father-daughter scenes touch you to the core, which are further well-contrasted with the mother-daughter kich-kich. Seema Pahwa is a delight to watch here and so is the one-sided conversation of Pankaj Tripathi facing the ceiling fan.

Ayushmann Khurana delivers an earnest performance and ably portrays the grey shades of his character without going overboard. All said and done, it is undoubtedly Rajkummar Rao who steals the show, not just because he’s a talented actor, but also because of his author-backed role. The role of Pritam Vidrohi is written so well that the actor laps it up and clearly revels in each scene. Pritam Vidrohi is a character you’ll carry with you home after watching Bareilly Ki Barfi.

The film’s director once quoted in an interview: “I am not saying independent means being feminist. I am not saying independent means not listening to your parents. It is about finding your space and finding your identity, which is a huge thing in our country.” Thanks, Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari for setting the record straight, teaching us the true meaning of women being independent and feminist, especially in the times when words like these have been hugely misconstrued in our films and literature. Folks, indulge yourself in this clean and toothsome delicacy that leaves a sweet aftertaste even after days of watching it.

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